Painting

Reflecting on reflections

For whatever reason, I’ve always been drawn to incorporating reflections in my photography, and in this I know I am certainly not alone. One of the most well known photographs with a reflection was that taken by that astonishing master of the photographic art, Henri Cartier-Bresson, recording a man leaping over (or into) a puddle. The photograph, entitled Derriere la Gare Saint-Lazare was regarded by Time Magazine as the ‘Photograph of the Century’. Without doubt it is a superb photograph, and certainly one that proves my point that you’re in the best of company if you use reflections in your work.

Gare Saint Lazare. 1932. © Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum Photos

Gare Saint Lazare. 1932. © Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum Photos

The power of the triptych

The creation of visual art is widely varied, not only in terms of the medium used, be in a digital sensor or oil paint, but also in the final form in which the artist presents their work. Although the single painting, photograph or composite has always been my favourite, I have also been drawn to works of art made up of different images arranged together, in particular the triptych.

The triptych (traditionally a painting made up of three sections) originated from early Christian art, and was primarily associated with altarpieces, although over time the form was used by artists in a range of contexts, including sculpture and paintings with non-religious themes, such as ‘Carnival’ by Max Beckmann.

‘Carnival’ by Max Beckman, Oil On Canvas, 1943.

‘Carnival’ by Max Beckman, Oil On Canvas, 1943.

Returning home

Many years before the camera; was invented (the modern camera that is, not it’s origins with the camera obscura), one of the most moving images ever made was given life by the great Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, born in Holland on the 16th July 1606. The image is likely to have been painted not long before Rembrandt’s death in 1669, and for over 300 years had entranced and moved the countless number of people who have gazed upon it.